Google Allo’s limitations explained in one word:

The Google Logo for India Independence Day 2014. (credit: Google Doodles)

Google’s new instant messaging client Allo doesn’t seem like a compelling product. Allo is missing many of the basic features you might expect in an instant messaging app: it only works with one device at a time, it doesn’t work on a desktop or laptop computer, it doesn’t support tablets very well, it doesn’t use a Google account, and it doesn’t support SMS. Allo has had a curiously incomplete product launch, and many Google users are left wondering what the company was thinking.

Allo’s limitations are deal breakers for many people in the hyper-connected developed world who are accustomed to multiple devices and a few GBs of internet connectivity. But what if you’re not in a developed country? Google hasn’t explicitly come out and said so, but Allo’s features and Google’s actions around the launch of Allo all point to it being targeted at developing countries, and one developing country in particular: India. When viewed through the lens of the average person in India, Allo’s “incomplete” launch, odd design decisions, and missing features suddenly make sense.

Google <3 India

Google’s love affair with India is no secret. Google is all about scale and having huge numbers of users, and if you look at a list of countries by population, China is first with 1.38 billion people; India is second with 1.32 billion people; and the United States is third, with 324 million people. Google would love to go to China, but that would mean dealing with the censorship-happy Chinese government, so India is the biggest country in the world where Google can freely do business. India is also the home country of Google CEO Sundar Pichai.

Read 17 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Google Allo’s limitations explained in one word:

The Google Logo for India Independence Day 2014. (credit: Google Doodles)

Google’s new instant messaging client Allo doesn’t seem like a compelling product. Allo is missing many of the basic features you might expect in an instant messaging app: it only works with one device at a time, it doesn’t work on a desktop or laptop computer, it doesn’t support tablets very well, it doesn’t use a Google account, and it doesn’t support SMS. Allo has had a curiously incomplete product launch, and many Google users are left wondering what the company was thinking.

Allo’s limitations are deal breakers for many people in the hyper-connected developed world who are accustomed to multiple devices and a few GBs of internet connectivity. But what if you’re not in a developed country? Google hasn’t explicitly come out and said so, but Allo’s features and Google’s actions around the launch of Allo all point to it being targeted at developing countries, and one developing country in particular: India. When viewed through the lens of the average person in India, Allo’s “incomplete” launch, odd design decisions, and missing features suddenly make sense.

Google <3 India

Google’s love affair with India is no secret. Google is all about scale and having huge numbers of users, and if you look at a list of countries by population, China is first with 1.38 billion people; India is second with 1.32 billion people; and the United States is third, with 324 million people. Google would love to go to China, but that would mean dealing with the censorship-happy Chinese government, so India is the biggest country in the world where Google can freely do business. India is also the home country of Google CEO Sundar Pichai.

Read 17 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Google Allo’s limitations explained in one word:

The Google Logo for India Independence Day 2014. (credit: Google Doodles)

Google’s new instant messaging client Allo doesn’t seem like a compelling product. Allo is missing many of the basic features you might expect in an instant messaging app: it only works with one device at a time, it doesn’t work on a desktop or laptop computer, it doesn’t support tablets very well, it doesn’t use a Google account, and it doesn’t support SMS. Allo has had a curiously incomplete product launch, and many Google users are left wondering what the company was thinking.

Allo’s limitations are deal breakers for many people in the hyper-connected developed world who are accustomed to multiple devices and a few GBs of internet connectivity. But what if you’re not in a developed country? Google hasn’t explicitly come out and said so, but Allo’s features and Google’s actions around the launch of Allo all point to it being targeted at developing countries, and one developing country in particular: India. When viewed through the lens of the average person in India, Allo’s “incomplete” launch, odd design decisions, and missing features suddenly make sense.

Google <3 India

Google’s love affair with India is no secret. Google is all about scale and having huge numbers of users, and if you look at a list of countries by population, China is first with 1.38 billion people; India is second with 1.32 billion people; and the United States is third, with 324 million people. Google would love to go to China, but that would mean dealing with the censorship-happy Chinese government, so India is the biggest country in the world where Google can freely do business. India is also the home country of Google CEO Sundar Pichai.

Read 17 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Google Allo’s limitations explained in one word:

The Google Logo for India Independence Day 2014. (credit: Google Doodles)

Google’s new instant messaging client Allo doesn’t seem like a compelling product. Allo is missing many of the basic features you might expect in an instant messaging app: it only works with one device at a time, it doesn’t work on a desktop or laptop computer, it doesn’t support tablets very well, it doesn’t use a Google account, and it doesn’t support SMS. Allo has had a curiously incomplete product launch, and many Google users are left wondering what the company was thinking.

Allo’s limitations are deal breakers for many people in the hyper-connected developed world who are accustomed to multiple devices and a few GBs of internet connectivity. But what if you’re not in a developed country? Google hasn’t explicitly come out and said so, but Allo’s features and Google’s actions around the launch of Allo all point to it being targeted at developing countries, and one developing country in particular: India. When viewed through the lens of the average person in India, Allo’s “incomplete” launch, odd design decisions, and missing features suddenly make sense.

Google <3 India

Google’s love affair with India is no secret. Google is all about scale and having huge numbers of users, and if you look at a list of countries by population, China is first with 1.38 billion people; India is second with 1.32 billion people; and the United States is third, with 324 million people. Google would love to go to China, but that would mean dealing with the censorship-happy Chinese government, so India is the biggest country in the world where Google can freely do business. India is also the home country of Google CEO Sundar Pichai.

Read 17 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Want an Apple Watch? For some Aetna customers, it’ll

Enlarge / Two current-gen Apple Watch Sport models. (credit: Andrew Cunningham)

On Tuesday, health insurance giant Aetna announced that it’s starting a new app-based health program that will exclusively rely on Apple products—namely, the iPhone, iPad, and Apple Watch. As part of the program, Aetna will subsidize Apple Watches for select customers as well as offer the smartwatches at no cost to their own 50,000 employees beginning in early 2017.

The news from Aetna, which covers about 23 million people nationwide, may please its Apple-loving customers. But no one will be as happy as Apple, which has recently pushed for its devices to be fashioned into medical hubs. Earlier this year, the company unveiled CareKit, an open source platform for creating healthcare apps.

In a joint statement with Aetna, Apple CEO Tim Cook said the following:

Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Want an Apple Watch? For some Aetna customers, it’ll

Enlarge / Two current-gen Apple Watch Sport models. (credit: Andrew Cunningham)

On Tuesday, health insurance giant Aetna announced that it’s starting a new app-based health program that will exclusively rely on Apple products—namely, the iPhone, iPad, and Apple Watch. As part of the program, Aetna will subsidize Apple Watches for select customers as well as offer the smartwatches at no cost to their own 50,000 employees beginning in early 2017.

The news from Aetna, which covers about 23 million people nationwide, may please its Apple-loving customers. But no one will be as happy as Apple, which has recently pushed for its devices to be fashioned into medical hubs. Earlier this year, the company unveiled CareKit, an open source platform for creating healthcare apps.

In a joint statement with Aetna, Apple CEO Tim Cook said the following:

Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Want an Apple Watch? For some Aetna customers, it’ll

Enlarge / Two current-gen Apple Watch Sport models. (credit: Andrew Cunningham)

On Tuesday, health insurance giant Aetna announced that it’s starting a new app-based health program that will exclusively rely on Apple products—namely, the iPhone, iPad, and Apple Watch. As part of the program, Aetna will subsidize Apple Watches for select customers as well as offer the smartwatches at no cost to their own 50,000 employees beginning in early 2017.

The news from Aetna, which covers about 23 million people nationwide, may please its Apple-loving customers. But no one will be as happy as Apple, which has recently pushed for its devices to be fashioned into medical hubs. Earlier this year, the company unveiled CareKit, an open source platform for creating healthcare apps.

In a joint statement with Aetna, Apple CEO Tim Cook said the following:

Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Want an Apple Watch? For some Aetna customers, it’ll

Enlarge / Two current-gen Apple Watch Sport models. (credit: Andrew Cunningham)

On Tuesday, health insurance giant Aetna announced that it’s starting a new app-based health program that will exclusively rely on Apple products—namely, the iPhone, iPad, and Apple Watch. As part of the program, Aetna will subsidize Apple Watches for select customers as well as offer the smartwatches at no cost to their own 50,000 employees beginning in early 2017.

The news from Aetna, which covers about 23 million people nationwide, may please its Apple-loving customers. But no one will be as happy as Apple, which has recently pushed for its devices to be fashioned into medical hubs. Earlier this year, the company unveiled CareKit, an open source platform for creating healthcare apps.

In a joint statement with Aetna, Apple CEO Tim Cook said the following:

Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Want an Apple Watch? For some Aetna customers, it’ll

Enlarge / Two current-gen Apple Watch Sport models. (credit: Andrew Cunningham)

On Tuesday, health insurance giant Aetna announced that it’s starting a new app-based health program that will exclusively rely on Apple products—namely, the iPhone, iPad, and Apple Watch. As part of the program, Aetna will subsidize Apple Watches for select customers as well as offer the smartwatches at no cost to their own 50,000 employees beginning in early 2017.

The news from Aetna, which covers about 23 million people nationwide, may please its Apple-loving customers. But no one will be as happy as Apple, which has recently pushed for its devices to be fashioned into medical hubs. Earlier this year, the company unveiled CareKit, an open source platform for creating healthcare apps.

In a joint statement with Aetna, Apple CEO Tim Cook said the following:

Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Want an Apple Watch? For some Aetna customers, it’ll

Enlarge / Two current-gen Apple Watch Sport models. (credit: Andrew Cunningham)

On Tuesday, health insurance giant Aetna announced that it’s starting a new app-based health program that will exclusively rely on Apple products—namely, the iPhone, iPad, and Apple Watch. As part of the program, Aetna will subsidize Apple Watches for select customers as well as offer the smartwatches at no cost to their own 50,000 employees beginning in early 2017.

The news from Aetna, which covers about 23 million people nationwide, may please its Apple-loving customers. But no one will be as happy as Apple, which has recently pushed for its devices to be fashioned into medical hubs. Earlier this year, the company unveiled CareKit, an open source platform for creating healthcare apps.

In a joint statement with Aetna, Apple CEO Tim Cook said the following:

Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments