Another shakeup at Nest as software responsibility heads to Google

(credit: Nest)

Just three months after Nest co-founder Tony Fadell left the company and new CEO Marwan Fawaz took over, Alphabet’s troubled smart home division, Nest, is apparently experiencing another shakeup. According to a report from Fortune, Google is “absorbing” Nest’s software engineers in order to form a “unified Internet of things platform.”

Hiroshi Lockheimer, the current head of Android, will lead the group. The Fortune report notes that the combined group will “continue to work” on Google Home, Google’s forthcoming Amazon Echo competitor. A previous report from The Information (paywall) stated that Nest’s request to work on Google Home was denied by Google. A Nest representative denied this statement and said the integration would be similar to the Amazon Echo.

Google and Nest were definitely not on a “unified” platform path before this. Nest created the “Works with Nest” program along with the wireless protocol “Thread.” Google is working on “Brillo,” a stripped down version of Android for IoT devices, and both companies are involved with the “Weave” communication standard. It’s all very complicated and incomplete.

Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Another shakeup at Nest as software responsibility heads to Google

(credit: Nest)

Just three months after Nest co-founder Tony Fadell left the company and new CEO Marwan Fawaz took over, Alphabet’s troubled smart home division, Nest, is apparently experiencing another shakeup. According to a report from Fortune, Google is “absorbing” Nest’s software engineers in order to form a “unified Internet of things platform.”

Hiroshi Lockheimer, the current head of Android, will lead the group. The Fortune report notes that the combined group will “continue to work” on Google Home, Google’s forthcoming Amazon Echo competitor. A previous report from The Information (paywall) stated that Nest’s request to work on Google Home was denied by Google. A Nest representative denied this statement and said the integration would be similar to the Amazon Echo.

Google and Nest were definitely not on a “unified” platform path before this. Nest created the “Works with Nest” program along with the wireless protocol “Thread.” Google is working on “Brillo,” a stripped down version of Android for IoT devices, and both companies are involved with the “Weave” communication standard. It’s all very complicated and incomplete.

Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Another shakeup at Nest as software responsibility heads to Google

(credit: Nest)

Just three months after Nest co-founder Tony Fadell left the company and new CEO Marwan Fawaz took over, Alphabet’s troubled smart home division, Nest, is apparently experiencing another shakeup. According to a report from Fortune, Google is “absorbing” Nest’s software engineers in order to form a “unified Internet of things platform.”

Hiroshi Lockheimer, the current head of Android, will lead the group. The Fortune report notes that the combined group will “continue to work” on Google Home, Google’s forthcoming Amazon Echo competitor. A previous report from The Information (paywall) stated that Nest’s request to work on Google Home was denied by Google. A Nest representative denied this statement and said the integration would be similar to the Amazon Echo.

Google and Nest were definitely not on a “unified” platform path before this. Nest created the “Works with Nest” program along with the wireless protocol “Thread.” Google is working on “Brillo,” a stripped down version of Android for IoT devices, and both companies are involved with the “Weave” communication standard. It’s all very complicated and incomplete.

Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Another shakeup at Nest as software responsibility heads to Google

(credit: Nest)

Just three months after Nest co-founder Tony Fadell left the company and new CEO Marwan Fawaz took over, Alphabet’s troubled smart home division, Nest, is apparently experiencing another shakeup. According to a report from Fortune, Google is “absorbing” Nest’s software engineers in order to form a “unified Internet of things platform.”

Hiroshi Lockheimer, the current head of Android, will lead the group. The Fortune report notes that the combined group will “continue to work” on Google Home, Google’s forthcoming Amazon Echo competitor. A previous report from The Information (paywall) stated that Nest’s request to work on Google Home was denied by Google. A Nest representative denied this statement and said the integration would be similar to the Amazon Echo.

Google and Nest were definitely not on a “unified” platform path before this. Nest created the “Works with Nest” program along with the wireless protocol “Thread.” Google is working on “Brillo,” a stripped down version of Android for IoT devices, and both companies are involved with the “Weave” communication standard. It’s all very complicated and incomplete.

Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Another shakeup at Nest as software responsibility heads to Google

(credit: Nest)

Just three months after Nest co-founder Tony Fadell left the company and new CEO Marwan Fawaz took over, Alphabet’s troubled smart home division, Nest, is apparently experiencing another shakeup. According to a report from Fortune, Google is “absorbing” Nest’s software engineers in order to form a “unified Internet of things platform.”

Hiroshi Lockheimer, the current head of Android, will lead the group. The Fortune report notes that the combined group will “continue to work” on Google Home, Google’s forthcoming Amazon Echo competitor. A previous report from The Information (paywall) stated that Nest’s request to work on Google Home was denied by Google. A Nest representative denied this statement and said the integration would be similar to the Amazon Echo.

Google and Nest were definitely not on a “unified” platform path before this. Nest created the “Works with Nest” program along with the wireless protocol “Thread.” Google is working on “Brillo,” a stripped down version of Android for IoT devices, and both companies are involved with the “Weave” communication standard. It’s all very complicated and incomplete.

Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

New analysis shows eastern US can handle 30 percent renewable electricity

Enlarge (credit: Dennis Schroeder, National Renewable Energy Lab)

As the US transitions to an increased reliance on renewable energy, most of the action has been on the West Coast, where both Hawaii and California have set targets of 50 percent renewable energy by 2030. But, in an effort to keep the pace, New York recently announced that it, too, would be aiming to get to 50 percent renewables by that date.

As in California, that level of intermittent renewable energy can pose a challenge for the grid. While New York has its own grid and is able to regulate the power there, the state is heavily integrated into the surrounding grids (including in Canada) and the Eastern Interconnection, which extends as far west as Kansas and Saskatchewan. This means New York’s grid management challenge will probably create strains that extend well beyond its borders. A new study from the National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL), however, indicates that the Eastern Interconnection is probably up to the task, but may require new incentives and regulations in order to function efficiently.

NREL didn’t look at New York’s case specifically; rather, it focused on getting the entire Eastern Interconnection at 30 percent wind and solar power. But that turns out to be in keeping with New York’s goals. Unlike California, the Empire State counts hydropower toward its 50 percent goal, and it currently gets a bit under 20 percent of its power from hydro. So, 30 percent wind and solar is about what New York plans to do; NREL simply applied it to the entire Eastern Interconnection.

Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

New analysis shows eastern US can handle 30 percent renewable electricity

Enlarge (credit: Dennis Schroeder, National Renewable Energy Lab)

As the US transitions to an increased reliance on renewable energy, most of the action has been on the West Coast, where both Hawaii and California have set targets of 50 percent renewable energy by 2030. But, in an effort to keep the pace, New York recently announced that it, too, would be aiming to get to 50 percent renewables by that date.

As in California, that level of intermittent renewable energy can pose a challenge for the grid. While New York has its own grid and is able to regulate the power there, the state is heavily integrated into the surrounding grids (including in Canada) and the Eastern Interconnection, which extends as far west as Kansas and Saskatchewan. This means New York’s grid management challenge will probably create strains that extend well beyond its borders. A new study from the National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL), however, indicates that the Eastern Interconnection is probably up to the task, but may require new incentives and regulations in order to function efficiently.

NREL didn’t look at New York’s case specifically; rather, it focused on getting the entire Eastern Interconnection at 30 percent wind and solar power. But that turns out to be in keeping with New York’s goals. Unlike California, the Empire State counts hydropower toward its 50 percent goal, and it currently gets a bit under 20 percent of its power from hydro. So, 30 percent wind and solar is about what New York plans to do; NREL simply applied it to the entire Eastern Interconnection.

Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

New analysis shows eastern US can handle 30 percent renewable electricity

Enlarge (credit: Dennis Schroeder, National Renewable Energy Lab)

As the US transitions to an increased reliance on renewable energy, most of the action has been on the West Coast, where both Hawaii and California have set targets of 50 percent renewable energy by 2030. But, in an effort to keep the pace, New York recently announced that it, too, would be aiming to get to 50 percent renewables by that date.

As in California, that level of intermittent renewable energy can pose a challenge for the grid. While New York has its own grid and is able to regulate the power there, the state is heavily integrated into the surrounding grids (including in Canada) and the Eastern Interconnection, which extends as far west as Kansas and Saskatchewan. This means New York’s grid management challenge will probably create strains that extend well beyond its borders. A new study from the National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL), however, indicates that the Eastern Interconnection is probably up to the task, but may require new incentives and regulations in order to function efficiently.

NREL didn’t look at New York’s case specifically; rather, it focused on getting the entire Eastern Interconnection at 30 percent wind and solar power. But that turns out to be in keeping with New York’s goals. Unlike California, the Empire State counts hydropower toward its 50 percent goal, and it currently gets a bit under 20 percent of its power from hydro. So, 30 percent wind and solar is about what New York plans to do; NREL simply applied it to the entire Eastern Interconnection.

Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

New analysis shows eastern US can handle 30 percent renewable electricity

Enlarge (credit: Dennis Schroeder, National Renewable Energy Lab)

As the US transitions to an increased reliance on renewable energy, most of the action has been on the West Coast, where both Hawaii and California have set targets of 50 percent renewable energy by 2030. But, in an effort to keep the pace, New York recently announced that it, too, would be aiming to get to 50 percent renewables by that date.

As in California, that level of intermittent renewable energy can pose a challenge for the grid. While New York has its own grid and is able to regulate the power there, the state is heavily integrated into the surrounding grids (including in Canada) and the Eastern Interconnection, which extends as far west as Kansas and Saskatchewan. This means New York’s grid management challenge will probably create strains that extend well beyond its borders. A new study from the National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL), however, indicates that the Eastern Interconnection is probably up to the task, but may require new incentives and regulations in order to function efficiently.

NREL didn’t look at New York’s case specifically; rather, it focused on getting the entire Eastern Interconnection at 30 percent wind and solar power. But that turns out to be in keeping with New York’s goals. Unlike California, the Empire State counts hydropower toward its 50 percent goal, and it currently gets a bit under 20 percent of its power from hydro. So, 30 percent wind and solar is about what New York plans to do; NREL simply applied it to the entire Eastern Interconnection.

Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

New analysis shows eastern US can handle 30 percent renewable electricity

Enlarge (credit: Dennis Schroeder, National Renewable Energy Lab)

As the US transitions to an increased reliance on renewable energy, most of the action has been on the West Coast, where both Hawaii and California have set targets of 50 percent renewable energy by 2030. But, in an effort to keep the pace, New York recently announced that it, too, would be aiming to get to 50 percent renewables by that date.

As in California, that level of intermittent renewable energy can pose a challenge for the grid. While New York has its own grid and is able to regulate the power there, the state is heavily integrated into the surrounding grids (including in Canada) and the Eastern Interconnection, which extends as far west as Kansas and Saskatchewan. This means New York’s grid management challenge will probably create strains that extend well beyond its borders. A new study from the National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL), however, indicates that the Eastern Interconnection is probably up to the task, but may require new incentives and regulations in order to function efficiently.

NREL didn’t look at New York’s case specifically; rather, it focused on getting the entire Eastern Interconnection at 30 percent wind and solar power. But that turns out to be in keeping with New York’s goals. Unlike California, the Empire State counts hydropower toward its 50 percent goal, and it currently gets a bit under 20 percent of its power from hydro. So, 30 percent wind and solar is about what New York plans to do; NREL simply applied it to the entire Eastern Interconnection.

Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments