Week in Pictures for Feb. 28

Slide Show

A slide show of photographs of the past week in New York City and the region includes a cemetery on Staten Island, a new PATH station platform at the World Trade Center hub, and a memorial for Ukrainian protesters in the East Village.

This weekend on “The New York Times Close Up,” an inside look at the most compelling articles in Sunday’s Times, Sam Roberts will speak with The Times’s Bill Keller, Anthony Tommasini, Al Baker and Eleanor Randolph; and the lawyer James Goodale. Tune in at 10 p.m. Saturday or 10 a.m. Sunday on NY1 News to watch.

Read current New York headlines and follow us on Twitter.

Big Ticket | Cityscape Views for $12 Million

Built in 1940, 737 Park Avenue was recently reimagined for the 21st century.Marilynn K. Yee/The New York Times Built in 1940, 737 Park Avenue was recently reimagined for the 21st century.

A sponsor unit at 737 Park Avenue, an Art Deco-style brick-and-limestone apartment building acquired by Macklowe Properties and the CIM Group in 2011 and since converted to 60 luxury condominiums, sold for $12,057,366.08 and was the most expensive sale of the week, according to city records. The monthly carrying costs are $6,720.68.

Built in 1940 from a design by the architect Sylvan Bien and reimagined for the 21st century on a grand scale by Handel Architects, 737 Park Avenue dominates the northeast corner of the avenue at East 71st Street. The updates include new casement windows and white oak floors. There are Miele appliances and marble floors and countertops in the windowed kitchens, and heated Italian marble floors in the master baths.

The new owners of No. 15A, a three-bedroom four-bath residence with cityscape views, are Glen and Lynn Tobias of Scarsdale. N.Y. Mr. Tobias, an investor, has been a senior adviser to Behrman Capital, a private stock fund, and is a former national chairman of the Anti-Defamation League. Serena Boardman of Sotheby’s International Realty represented the buyers; Jarrett White, a Macklowe sales director, handled the sale for the sponsor.

Another sponsor unit, this one a full-floor apartment at One Madison, on the southeast corner of Madison Square Park, sold for $11,709,875 and was the week’s runner-up. The media tycoon Rupert Murdoch, in search of a post-divorce bachelor pad, caused a stir at One Madison by recently contracting to buy the unfinished triplex penthouse and the three-bedroom unit below it on the 57th floor for an aggregate $57.25 million. Other buyers of note at the building are the Brazilian supermodel Gisele Bündchen and her husband, Tom Brady, the quarterback for the New England Patriots, who paid $14 million for their Manhattan pied-à-terre.

From its perch on the 48th floor, the four-bedroom four-and-a-half bath condo that was recorded last week, No. 48A, will have “cinematic views” (an offering plan descriptor) of the city similar to those Mr. Murdoch will enjoy. Panoramic vistas are a major selling point at the slender 60-story glass tower that was rescued from fiscal meltdown limbo by the Related Companies, CIM, and the HFZ Capital Group. The monthly carrying costs for the 3,310-square-foot apartment are $7,884.

Leslie Wilson, a senior vice president of Related sales and the director of sales for One Madison, represented the sponsor. The buyer used a limited liability company name, One Madison. According to Ms. Wilson, One Madison is “75 percent sold with just eight units remaining.”

“With a billionaire of Rupert Murdoch’s stature buying in a downtown building like this one, it speaks to the confidence buyers have in both the product and the location,” she said.

Big Ticket includes closed sales from the previous week, ending Wednesday.

A version of this article appears in print on 03/02/2014, on page RE2 of the NewYork edition with the headline: Cityscape Views.

New York Today: Seeking the Homeless

Helping those in need.Spencer Platt/Getty Images Helping those in need.

Good ice-cold Friday to you. It is 10 degrees with a wind chill of minus 2.

And more snow is coming.

This winter has been one of the 20 coldest on record in New York City, and there are many people without homes.

On Tuesday, the city updated its count of the homeless in shelters: 52,261 (29,747 adults and 22,514 children).

And, at last count, the number of homeless people on the streets and subways was 3,180, officials said.

The annual, four-weekend program, “Don’t Walk By,” which ends this weekend, sends volunteers to walk every block of Manhattan, engaging the homeless.

Those who want a hot meal are shuttled by van to a church, where they can meet with social workers and medical professionals.

In the last three weekends, volunteers talked to 652 homeless people; 477 agreed to a meal.

“For folks on the street, this has been one of the toughest winters in memory,” said James Winans, of the Bowery Mission, one of five organizations behind the walk.

Many days this winter, the mission has hosted as many as 300 people for meals and 200 overnight.

“We’ve never seen numbers like that,” Mr. Winans said. “After Sandy we had 160 staying overnight, and we thought that was a lot.”

Here’s what else you need to know for Friday and the weekend.

WEATHER

Penetrating, head-down cold. High of 18, with wind chills in the single digits and ample, pointless sunshine.

A day of respite tomorrow, with a high of 35 (only 10 degrees below normal).

Then: snow, Sunday into Monday, potentially eight inches or more.

COMMUTE

Subways: Delays on southbound 2 and 3. Check latest status.

Rails: L.I.R.R. Montauk Branch suspended between Patchogue and Babylon. Check L.I.R.R., Metro-North or N.J. Transit status.

Roads: Check traffic map or radio report on the 1s or the 8s.

Alternate-side parking is in effect.

Weekend Travel Hassles: Check subway disruptions or list of street closings.

COMING UP TODAY

- The City Council takes up a proposal to hang a historical sign on Wall Street at the site of an 18th-century slave market. 10 a.m.

- Mayor de Blasio speaks at the police promotion ceremony at 11 a.m.

- Students in East Harlem release balloons at 2:30 p.m. on the second anniversary of the death of a first grader hit by a truck on his way to school.

- Theater on skates at Bryant Park: “Fire & Ice: The Rise & Fall of the Norse Gods,” with the Frozen Feet Theater. 1 p.m. [Free]

- A nighttime gallery tour of Bushwick, “Beat Nite,” followed by a big after-party. 6 p.m. onward. [Free]

-”Blacks in Experimental Film” features clips and shorts going back to 1914, at Maysles Cinema in Harlem. 8 p.m. [$10]

- For more events, see The New York Times Arts & Entertainment guide.

IN THE NEWS

- A Roman sculpture of a reclining woman, stored in a Queens warehouse, may have been looted from Italy decades ago. Federal agents are seizing it. [New York Times]

- Before the George Washington Bridge lane closings, aides to Gov. Chris Christie joked about causing traffic jams in front of the home of a prominent rabbi. [New York Times]

- The mayor may be boycotting, but Police Commissioner William Bratton plans to march in the St. Patrick’s Day parade. [Daily News]

- Threats of a school shooting made on social media prompted heightened security at three Brooklyn high schools. [PIX 11 News]

- Mayor de Blasio moved to stop three charter schools from moving into public school buildings. [New York Times]

- Scoreboard: Heat scorch Knicks, 108-82. Nets crush Nuggets, 112-89. Hockey returns: Rangers top Blackhawks, 2-1. Devils over Blue Jackets, 5-2. Islanders beat Maple Leafs in overtime, 5-4.

Joseph Burgess contributed reporting.

New York Today is a morning roundup that stays live from 6 a.m. till late morning.

What would you like to see here to start your day? Post a comment, email us at nytoday@nytimes.com or reach us via Twitter using #NYToday.

Find us on weekdays at nytoday.com.

Warmth From a Trash Can

Dear Diary:

I came to New York in the late ’60s. On cold nights in the downtown area, on street corners, you could find trash-can fires. These fires were tended by street people.

There were many trash-can fires along the Bowery; for the folks who had no place to go, these fires kept them warm and busy looking for trash, scrap lumber, cardboard boxes to feed the 50-gallon drums, with holes cut near the bottom to give draft. On icy days and nights, much like this winter, these cheery fires were ornaments of warmth, available for those who could not afford the comfort of a coffee shop or the shelter of a hotel.

By 1990 or so, those little islands of comfort disappeared from the streets and parks of Manhattan, I don’t know about the other boroughs but I’d like to think this custom continues elsewhere in New York.

Read all recent entries and our updated submissions guidelines. Reach us via email diary@nytimes.com or follow @NYTMetro on Twitter using the hashtag #MetDiary.

New York Today: Winter’s Pesky Visitors

Zach Wise for The New York Times

Good Thursday morning. The biting cold continues.

The mice have taken note.

A New York exterminator’s calendar looks something like this:

March means termites.

May, ants.

Summer months are filled, like the air, with mosquitoes.

What’s winter’s pest?

Typically, mice.

PestWorld, an advocacy group for the pest control industry, says 45 percent of mouse infestations occur during the coldest months.

They’re not looking for food, but heat.

Within kitchen stoves, for example.

So has the bitterly cold winter caused a record infestation?

Actually, no. Mouse violations in multifamily dwellings are down from the previous three winters, the city says.

Inspectors issued 3,171 violations from October through Feb. 25 of this year, versus 3,514 in the same period last year.

And 4,600 in 2012.

A mouse expert and Harvard biologist, Hopi Hoekstra, gave this explanation:

“Mice populations fluctuate from year to year,” Professor Hoekstra said. “Because it’s been especially cold, it may have resulted in poor reproduction and many natural deaths.”

Brooklyn is still the leader in mouse violations.

If you have heard something go rustle in the night, we can offer this: a richly dotted map of the pest control professionals in our city.

Tell us your mice stories in the comments, or using #NYToday on Twitter.

Here’s what else you need to know for Thursday.

WEATHER

Get out your neck tube. A cold front is creeping in this afternoon.

Windy, with a high of 32.

Snow falls here and there after lunch. Temperatures fall everywhere after dinner.

The low is 10, but it will feel like zero.

COMMUTE

Subways: Check latest status.

Rails: Check L.I.R.R., Metro-North or N.J. Transit status.

Roads: Check traffic map or radio report on the 1s or the 8s.

Alternate-side parking is in effect.

COMING UP TODAY

- Mayor de Blasio holds a black history month youth event at Gracie Mansion and visits a police station in East Harlem with Police Commissioner Bratton.

- Beatles vs. Rolling Stones: a debate. Mike Myers argues that the Beatles were better; the comic Ophira Eisenberg argues for the Stones. At the Public Library for the Performing Arts. 6 p.m. [Free]

- Self-explanatory panel name: “Beyond the Kale: Urban Agriculture and Social Justice Activism in NYC.” At the New School. 6 p.m. [Free, registration required]

- A lecture about Mary Wells, the Motown star who sang “My Guy,” at Jackie Robinson Recreation Center uptown. 6:30 p.m. [Free]

- Lorrie Moore reads from her new short-story collection “Bark” at the Union Square Barnes & Noble. 7 p.m. [Free]

- For more events, see The New York Times Arts & Entertainment guide.

IN THE NEWS

- A rookie police officer was shot in the legs after he pulled a fare-beater off a bus in Brooklyn. [New York Times]

- An old school bus brings fresh produce to parts of the Bronx where it’s hard to find. [New York Times]

- Spike Lee’s anti-gentrification rant resonated a bit in his old neighborhood of Fort Greene … [New York Times]

- .. But Errol Louis of The Daily News called baloney on Mr. Lee. [Dailly News]

– The city comptroller, Scott Stringer, is looking into allegations of price-fixing by school-lunch milk suppliers. [Fox 5 New York]

– Scoreboard: Blazers shred Nets, 120-84.

Joseph Burgess and Andy Newman contributed reporting.

New York Today is a morning roundup that stays live from 6 a.m. till late morning.

What would you like to see here to start your day? Post a comment, email us at nytoday@nytimes.com or reach us via Twitter using #NYToday.

Find us on weekdays at nytoday.com.

A Pregnant Worker, Forced to Go on Unpaid Leave, Is Back on the Job


As readers of “The Working Life” column know, Floralba Fernandez Espinal was forced out of her job at a thrift store in the Bronx last month because she was pregnant and could no longer do heavy lifting.

Now, thanks to the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act, which took effect in January, after nearly two months without work, Ms. Fernandez is back on the job and rejoicing over her victory.

The law requires employers to make reasonable accommodations for pregnant workers, so long as those accommodations don’t cause undue hardship for the employer; Ms. Fernandez’s case was one of the first tests of the law. After several rounds of negotiations with her union representatives and lawyers, the thrift store’s management agreed to reinstate Ms. Fernandez in a light-duty capacity, which was what her obstetrician had ordered. This week, she has been pricing and hanging clothing instead of hauling heavy piles of clothing from the storeroom to the showroom as she was required to do in the past. Her employer, Unique Thrift, is a national chain of thrift shops with a store in the Kingsbridge section of the Bronx.

Unique Thrift also agreed to give Ms. Fernandez $1,088 in back pay, to maintain her level of seniority at the company and to comply with all of the requirements of the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act, her lawyers said.

Ms. Fernandez, who earns $8 an hour and has worked at Unique Thrift for about two years, desperately needs the back pay, her union representatives said. During her time out of work, she struggled to pay her bills. Ms. Fernandez, who is 22 and four and a half months pregnant, had to borrow money from her family to buy groceries, and her boyfriend, a livery taxi driver, worked double shifts to help pay rent and utilities.

Stuart Appelbaum, president of the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union, which represented Ms. Fernandez, praised her for “the courage to pursue her rights.”

Dina Bakst, co-president of a Better Balance, a legal advocacy group, represented Ms. Fernandez along with Larry Cary in the negotiations with Unique Thrift. She said she hoped that Ms. Fernandez’s victory “will give other pregnant women in New York City, especially those in low wage and physically demanding jobs, the courage to stand up for what they need to stay healthy and on the job.”

In a statement, Unique Thrift’s management declined to discuss the specifics of Ms. Fernandez’s case, but said the company “has had, and will continue to have, many pregnant employees on its active work force.”

New York Today: Bundle Up, It’s Almost March

Anorak, check.Damon Winter/The New York Times Anorak, check.

Good Wednesday morning to you.

It is 27 degrees.

Here’s something odd: In 67 hours, it will be March.

Days are lengthening — there is as much light now as there is in mid-October.

The sun inches higher in the sky.

But the thermometer still seems convinced that it’s mid-January.

Temperatures for the next seven days will average about 12 degrees below normal — just below freezing during the day, down to 20 at night.

That would actually be well below normal in mid-January.

Oh, and it will also snow this morning.

Just a puff — probably less than an inch.

The cold, though, is not going away.

This afternoon, the mercury might nudge 30 for a moment, like a strong-man bell rung by a weak man.

But even as the temperature creeps up, so will the wind.

Wind chills will lurk in the teens all day and night, down to the single digits by tomorrow morning as the temperature drops to 15.

By Friday morning, the wind chill will be back in minus-land.

The normal high temperature for this time of year is 45.

It is not in the forecast any time soon.

Enough statistics. Here’s the advisory: Pull down your ear flaps.

And here’s what else is happening.

COMMUTE

Subways: Check latest status.

Rails: Check L.I.R.R., Metro-North or N.J. Transit status.

Roads: Check traffic map or radio report on the 1s or the 8s.

Alternate-side parking is suspended “to facilitate the winter weather response.”

COMING UP TODAY

- The Olympic ice-dancing champions Meryl Davis and Charlie White skate at Rockefeller Center at 8:30 a.m.

- A flash mob featuring the mayor’s Office to Combat Domestic Violence will dance, shout and otherwise rise up to “promote healthy relationships” at the ferry terminal in Staten Island at 7 a.m.

- Mayor de Blasio is having some New Yorkers over to Gracie Mansion tonight to talk about the importance of universal pre-K and after-school programs.

- There’s more to DNA than life. A chemist shows how DNA can be used on a nanoscale to produce objects, crystals and nanodevices, at New York University. 4:30 p.m. [Free]

- “Ask a Native New Yorker”: the author of that Gothamist column, Jake Dobkin, joins NY1’s Pat Kiernan at the Brooklyn Historical Society. 6:30 p.m. [$5]

- Imam Shamsi Ali and Rabbi Marc Schneier talk about the issues dividing and uniting Jews and Muslims, the subject of their book “Sons of Abraham,” at Barnes & Noble on 82nd and Broadway. 7 p.m. [Free]

- Elijah Wood talks about his soon-to-open film “Grand Piano” at the Film Society Lincoln Center. 6:30 p.m. [Free, arrive one hour early]

- Rosie Perez discusses her memoir, “Handbook for an Unpredictable Life: How I Survived Sister Renata and My Crazy Mother and Still Came Out Smiling (With Great Hair),” at St. Joseph’s College in Brooklyn. 7:30 p.m. [Free, R.S.V.P.]

- A show of new art exploring the legacy of Freud and his Austrian peers, “Vienna Complex,” opens at Austrian Cultural Forum New York on the East Side. 6 p.m. [Free]

- A philosopher, Zev Adams, muses on the subjective experience of color and what it means, at the Brooklyn Public Library. 7 p.m. [Free]

- For more events, see The New York Times Arts & Entertainment guide.

IN THE NEWS

- Spike Lee, multimillionaire resident of the Upper East Side, went on a rant against the gentrification of his native Brooklyn in a speech last night. [Daily News]

- A toxicologist took the stand in Kerry Kennedy’s defense at her driving-while-on-sleeping-pills trial. [New York Times]

Joseph Burgess contributed reporting.

New York Today is a morning roundup that stays live from 6 a.m. till late morning.

What would you like to see here to start your day? Post a comment, email us at nytoday@nytimes.com or reach us via Twitter using #NYToday.

Find us on weekdays at nytoday.com.

Cartoons in the Elevator

Dear Diary:

Every Tuesday and Thursday morning, I swim at a pool on the glass-domed top floor of Le Parker Meridien Hotel, on 57th Street near Seventh Avenue. The hotel caters mostly to businessmen.

The elevators house small rectangular TV screens above the inner doors that show old silent movies of either Tom and Jerry cartoons or Charlie Chaplin.

One morning while I was waiting for the elevator to go up to the pool, the elevator door opened to reveal a businessman, attaché case in hand, looking up at the television screen.

Before I entered, I reminded him that he had reached the lobby level.

He pointed to the television screen and replied, “I have to find out what happens at the end of the cartoon.”

We rode up together.

Read all recent entries and our updated submissions guidelines. Reach us via email diary@nytimes.com or follow @NYTMetro on Twitter using the hashtag #MetDiary.

Share Your Stories of Street Harassment in New York City

Let’s consider this the beginning of what we hope will be a continuing conversation.

For a coming series of articles and first-person accounts, City Room would like to hear your stories of street harassment and subway harassment.

How has harassment or the fear of harassment affected your life in New York City? Please share your stories in the comments.

Some questions to consider as you write:

How safe do you feel in New York City? Have you been harassed, and how do you define harassment? Does it occur often? How have you dealt with this? Whom did you talk to about it, if anyone? What questions do you have about safety? How have safety concerns changed how you navigate the city?

If you are uncomfortable with posting your story here, please share your experiences with us at metro@nytimes.com.

We will follow up with you shortly if we select you as a potential interview participant.

You can read one Brooklyn woman’s story here.