How Are You Celebrating Queen Beatrix’s Abdication?

Farewell, Queen Beatrix.Jerry Lampen/Reuters Farewell, Queen Beatrix.

Subjects of the Dutch colony of Nieuw-Amsterdam, arise! After 33 years as your benevolent overseer, your queen has forsaken you.

Queen Beatrix is queen no more.

Maxima, the queen consort to the new king, Willem-Alexander, may take her spot as reigning female personage. But Beatrix shall not be replaced, not now, or ever.

And so we ask, City Room readers: what are you doing today to mark Beatrix’s exit from the throne?

How Are You Celebrating Queen Beatrix’s Abdication?

Farewell, Queen Beatrix.Jerry Lampen/Reuters Farewell, Queen Beatrix.

Subjects of the Dutch colony of Nieuw-Amsterdam, arise! After 33 years as your benevolent overseer, your queen has forsaken you.

Queen Beatrix is queen no more.

Maxima, the queen consort to the new king, Willem-Alexander, may take her spot as reigning female personage. But Beatrix shall not be replaced, not now, or ever.

And so we ask, City Room readers: what are you doing today to mark Beatrix’s exit from the throne?

How Are You Celebrating Queen Beatrix’s Abdication?

Farewell, Queen Beatrix.Jerry Lampen/Reuters Farewell, Queen Beatrix.

Subjects of the Dutch colony of Nieuw-Amsterdam, arise! After 33 years as your benevolent overseer, your queen has forsaken you.

Queen Beatrix is queen no more.

Maxima, the queen consort to the new king, Willem-Alexander, may take her spot as reigning female personage. But Beatrix shall not be replaced, not now, or ever.

And so we ask, City Room readers: what are you doing today to mark Beatrix’s exit from the throne?

Routledge to Publish Porn Studies Journal

Pornography has made increasing non-clandestine appearances on college campuses, thanks to events like Sex Week, which has drawn criticism for spicing up educational offerings workshops with sex-toy raffles and lectures by porn stars. Soon, campus types will also be able ponder the mysteries of sexuality through a less obviously titillating medium: a full-fledged scholarly journal dedicated to porn.

Porn Studies, to be published by Routledge starting in 2014, is described as “the first dedicated, international, peer-reviewed journal to critically explore those cultural products and services designated as pornographic and their cultural, economic, historical, institutional, legal and social contexts,” with particular attention to “the intersection of sexuality, gender, race, class, age and ability.”

The journal, edited by two British academics, Feona Attwood and Clarissa Smith, has already inspired some hearty scholarly endorsements. “We have waited a long time for an academic journal that treats the subject of the representation of human sexuality with the seriousness it deserves,” Julie Peakman, a historian at the University of London and the author of “Mighty Lewd Books: The Development of Pornography in 18th-Century England,” said in a statement. “I look forward to a lively and disciplined debate across different disciplines.”

Lincoln Center Out of Doors Festival to Celebrate Kronos Quartet

As part of its 40th anniversary, the Kronos Quartet will present Kronos at 40, a five-day program that will include 28 free performances on Lincoln Center’s plazas during the opening week of this year’s Lincoln Center Out of Doors festival, which runs from July 24 through Aug. 11. The ensemble’s programs will include 11 premieres (including four newly commissioned works), and collaborations with dancers, pop musicians and indie classical performers. They are also the group’s first New York performances with its new cellist, Sunny Jungin Yang.

The Kronos series is unusual for Lincoln Center Out of Doors, a festival more typically given to unrelated (or loosely related) single-evening events. That format is largely preserved in the festival’s second and third weeks.

This year’s Out of Doors, the 43rd, will include more than 100 free performances, including a concert of traditional Greek music by Magda Giannikou (July 26); a tribute to Lead Belly by Dan Zanes and Friends (July 27); a new arrangement of the Pixies album “Surfer Rosa,” by the Asphalt Orchestra (July 28); dance performances by Kyle Abraham’s Abraham.In.Motion and The Living Word Project (Aug. 1); and concerts by Rubén Blades (Aug. 7); the Crickets (Buddy Holly’s band) and Nick Lowe (both Aug. 10); and Bobby Rush and Allen Toussaint (both Aug. 11).

Kronos at 40 begins with the world premiere of “Ritual Cycle,” a dance piece by Mark Dendy Dance & Theater Projects (July 24 and 25) and an Afrobeat and Afro-futurist program in which the Kronos will join a roster that includes Red Hot + Fela Live, Tony Allen, Superhuman Happiness and members of several indie-rock bands. Other Kronos performances include programs of works written or arranged for the ensemble by Omar Souleyman, Ram Narayan and Van-Anh Vanessa Vo (July 26); Bryce Dessner, Clint Mansell and Dan Deacon (July 28) among others; and collaborations with My Brightest Diamond and Emily Wells (July 25); and the Brooklyn Youth Chorus (July 27).

Cannes Adds Jim Jarmusch’s Vampire Film

“Only Lovers Left Alive,” a vampire film by Jim Jarmusch, has been added to the lineup in competition at the Cannes Film Festival, its organizers said.

Mr. Jarmusch, who won the festival’s Grand Prix in 2005 for his comedy drama “Broken Flowers,” wrote and directed “Only Lovers Left Alive,” which stars Tom Hiddleston (“The Avengers”) and Tilda Swinton (“We Need to Talk About Kevin”) as paramours who drift apart and reunite over the centuries. The cast also includes Mia Wasikowska, John Hurt and Anton Yelchin.

This year’s Cannes Film Festival will run from May 15 through 26 and will open with Baz Luhrmann’s adaptation of “The Great Gatsby.” Other films on its competition slate include Joel and Ethan Coen’s “Inside Llewyn Davis,” Steven Soderbergh’s “Behind the Candelabra” and Alexander Payne’s “Nebraska.”

Cuomo Asks Con Ed To Freeze Bonuses for Top Executives

Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo called on Tuesday for Consolidated Edison to freeze extra bonuses paid to senior executives for their response to Hurricane Sandy, other storms and a monthlong lockout of 8,000 workers last year.

The governor’s demand came five days after one of the company’s directors told The New York Times that the executives were given more than $600,000 for “exemplary” performance in handling several trying events. The company, New York City’s primary utility, said those events included the hurricane late last year that left hundreds of thousands of Con Edison customers without power for at least four days.

The governor appointed a panel, known as a Moreland Commission, to investigate how Con Edison and other utilities prepared for the hurricane and responded after it swept through the metropolitan region at the end of October.

On Monday, Mr. Cuomo sent a letter to Kevin Burke, the chairman and chief executive of Con Edison, stating that he would order utility regulators to look into the bonuses to ensure that they would not be charged to the company’s customers.

The governor followed up on Tuesday by announcing that he had asked Con Edison “to freeze the remaining executive bonuses until the Public Service Commission review is complete. I also urge Con Ed to fully cooperate with the Public Service Commission’s review so we can ensure ratepayers are protected.”

A spokesman for the company said that Mr. Burke had already agreed to return the extra bonus of $315,000 that the board of directors awarded him. That bonus had raised his total compensation for the year to $7.4 million, according to the company’s proxy statement.

The spokesman said on Tuesday that three other senior executives who had received extra bonuses would return theirs, too.

Craig Ivey, the company’s president, received an extra bonus of $146,100, raising his total compensation for the year to more than $3 million.
Robert Hoglund, the chief financial officer, got an extra bonus of $82,900 that took his total compensation to about $2.3 million. And Elizabeth D. Moore, the general counsel, got an extra bonus of $70,000 and total pay of more than $1.7 million.

The bonuses were awarded at the discretion of the board’s compensation committee. The committee’s chairman, George Campbell Jr., said in an interview with The Times last week that in the committee’s judgment, “the company performed in exemplary fashion.”

Cuomo Asks Con Ed To Freeze Bonuses for Top Executives

Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo called on Tuesday for Consolidated Edison to freeze extra bonuses paid to senior executives for their response to Hurricane Sandy, other storms and a monthlong lockout of 8,000 workers last year.

The governor’s demand came five days after one of the company’s directors told The New York Times that the executives were given more than $600,000 for “exemplary” performance in handling several trying events. The company, New York City’s primary utility, said those events included the hurricane late last year that left hundreds of thousands of Con Edison customers without power for at least four days.

The governor appointed a panel, known as a Moreland Commission, to investigate how Con Edison and other utilities prepared for the hurricane and responded after it swept through the metropolitan region at the end of October.

On Monday, Mr. Cuomo sent a letter to Kevin Burke, the chairman and chief executive of Con Edison, stating that he would order utility regulators to look into the bonuses to ensure that they would not be charged to the company’s customers.

The governor followed up on Tuesday by announcing that he had asked Con Edison “to freeze the remaining executive bonuses until the Public Service Commission review is complete. I also urge Con Ed to fully cooperate with the Public Service Commission’s review so we can ensure ratepayers are protected.”

A spokesman for the company said that Mr. Burke had already agreed to return the extra bonus of $315,000 that the board of directors awarded him. That bonus had raised his total compensation for the year to $7.4 million, according to the company’s proxy statement.

The spokesman said on Tuesday that three other senior executives who had received extra bonuses would return theirs, too.

Craig Ivey, the company’s president, received an extra bonus of $146,100, raising his total compensation for the year to more than $3 million.
Robert Hoglund, the chief financial officer, got an extra bonus of $82,900 that took his total compensation to about $2.3 million. And Elizabeth D. Moore, the general counsel, got an extra bonus of $70,000 and total pay of more than $1.7 million.

The bonuses were awarded at the discretion of the board’s compensation committee. The committee’s chairman, George Campbell Jr., said in an interview with The Times last week that in the committee’s judgment, “the company performed in exemplary fashion.”

Opera America Program to Aid 13 American Companies

Thirteen opera companies across the United States will share $300,000 in grants awarded by Opera America in the first year of its new Building Opera Audiences program. The grants, which range from $7,500 to $30,000, are for programs meant to increase first-time opera attendance, and to increase return visits.

In particular, the organization sought projects that used technology and social media, offered special events in community theaters, or sought to engage listeners in discussions about perceived barriers to enjoying opera. The winning companies were selected from a pool of 67 companies that applied for the grants. The grants are underwritten by the Ann and Gordon Getty Foundation.

The projects to be funded offer a variety of approaches to building an audience. Opera on the James, in Lynchburg, Va., will use its funding for “Get Real,” a project that includes a short mixed-genre opera (also called “Get Real”) as a way of introducing young urban listeners to the form, as well as excerpts from standard repertory operas in new orchestrations, with hip-hop rhythms, spoken word and video.

American Opera Projects, a Brooklyn company that focuses on contemporary works, will  create a mobile app called “Have a Voice,” which will allow the company’s audiences – and those of several other participating organizations – to offer feedback to creative artists, as well as opportunities for discounts and prizes (including tickets).

The Arizona Opera won its grant for a program meant to find opera fans in the Hispanic community, by way of school programs and a Spanish marketing program in Tucson and Phoenix. The Los Angeles Opera’s “Newcomer Project” offers preparatory materials and discounted tickets in the hope of demystifying the opera experience – something that the Florentine Opera Company, in Milwaukee, also plans to do through its Bohème Society, which will offer film screenings, backstage tours and receptions to new listeners.

The other companies that won grants are the Madison Opera, Opera Memphis, the Opera Theater of Pittsburgh, the San Francisco Opera, the Sarasota Opera, the Seattle Opera, the Syracuse Opera and the Vancouver Opera. Opera America plans to monitor and evaluate the projects, and to share its findings with companies in the organization.

Netflix Prison Series Gets July Release Date

Though there was once a time when Netflix was most closely associated with its bright red DVD-return envelopes, the company — now better known as a video-streaming service — is hoping that orange will be its color this summer. On Tuesday, Netflix announced that it has scheduled its next original series, “Orange Is the New Black,” a comedy-drama set in a women’s prison, to have its premiere on July 11; and, as has become its custom, it will make all thirteen episodes of the series available for viewing at once.

Adapted from Piper Kerman’s memoir of the same title, “Orange Is the New Black” chronicles a Brooklyn woman (played by Taylor Schilling) whose relationship with a drug runner (Laura Prepon) gets her sentenced to a year in prison. The series, which also stars Jason Biggs, Kate Mulgrew, Natasha Lyonne and Pablo Schreiber, is created by Jenji Kohan, who previously mined laughs from law-breaking women as the creator of the Showtime comedy “Weeds.”

“Orange Is the New Black” will be the fourth original series that Netflix has introduced this year, following its hit political drama “House of Cards,” its suspense thriller “Hemlock Grove” and its new season of “Arrested Development,” which will have its debut on May 26.